Information

Mud dog 1600 hydro excavator

Mud dog 1600 hydro excavator



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Mud dog 1600 hydro excavator

This was originally meant to be a project for the CECO contest, but I just never got around to it, so it's a bit late. I made some major changes and would really like to see it as a finished product, so I'm throwing it up on the forums to get some feedback.

First off, the project was meant to use a 1500hp excavator, but I've since acquired a couple of 1600s, which work great, so the contest was cancelled, but now I'm free to use those instead.

Anyways, here's what the project consists of.

Rear loader with loader forks

Rear scoop

Front loader with loader forks

Side loader with loader forks

Cab for the front loader

Cab for the rear loader

Front end for loader

Cab for side loader

Cab for rear loader

Cab for scoop

Cab for side loader

I'm not gonna post all of that up because it's all pretty basic. Instead, I'll post some pics with a little bit of commentary.

The loader is made from a CECO frame, which is made from the same aluminum as the original CECO body (no longer made).

The front loader has a single wheel steering, which means you have to do all steering on the front wheels. It's no big deal, but it does take some practice. I'm not sure if that's what the original design intended or not.

The side loader has 2 wheels on the front end that act as a front end loader.

The rear loader is a bit more complicated. The rear end is a single rear wheel that has 2 forks for each arm. The forks fold out like the front forks fold, but the forks are longer, which gives it better weight balance and allows you to easily push the scoop up and back. They also have to fold up and down, which is a bit more difficult than the front forks because of the weight.

The scoop itself has a frame with a single wheel at the end. There's some sort of arm attached to it that acts as the scoop. There's another arm attached to the frame that serves as the rear scoop.

The rear scoop folds up and down as the front scoop does, but is longer. The top is a bit easier to push up and back because of the longer arm on the back side. It also has a scoop on the front, but this is attached to the mn scoop rather than the frame.

The scoop also has its own arm that folds down like the loader forks do, which makes it easier to load stuff in the back.

The mn scoop is basically the back of the truck with a bunch of pipes and tanks attached to it.

Here's a shot of the scoop open.

This is a view from the back, so you can see all of the pipes and tanks.

Here's a closer shot of one of the tanks.

This is a side view of the scoop and loader.

The cab is built around a CECO body that's attached to the frame.

The front of the cab has a screen on the front and a bunch of pipes and hoses attached to the top of it.

The back of the cab has 2 big tanks, and 2 smaller tanks, and a bunch of hoses.

The scoop is attached to a frame at the back.

The scoop has a pipe that goes from the top of it to the rear of the cab.

This is a view from the side of the scoop.

The rear of the cab has a bunch of pipes that go to the sides of the cab.

The front of the cab also has a bunch of pipes attached to it.

This is a shot of the cab opening and closing.

I'll end this with a few pictures of the actual truck.

This is a shot of the rear of the truck with the scoop on the back.

This is a shot of the front of the truck.

This is a shot of the front of the scoop.

This is a shot of the front of the scoop with the loader on it.

That's all for this one. Hopefully it gives a bit of a better idea of what I did. If you have any questions, let me know.

Good job, but I would try to put the mn scoop frame on top of the frame, instead of underneath, so you wouldn't have to be as careful of the weight. I know it's easier to move it around with a single wheel (and the mn wheel) but it can cause some problems if you have to use all of the front wheels to move it. I guess that makes more sense if you're going to do that anyway, since a rear wheel drive machine would only have the front wheels turning.

Good job, but I would try to put the mn scoop frame on top of the frame, instead of underneath, so you wouldn't have to be as careful of the weight. I know it's easier to move it around with a single wheel (and the mn wheel) but it can cause some problems if you have to use all of the front wheels to move it. I guess that makes more sense if you're going to do that anyway, since a rear wheel drive machine would only have the front wheels turning.

Good idea, but I don't have a lot of experience with wheeled machines. There's a lot of design problems with these types of vehicles, but if I were doing it agn I'd probably take the side loader design a bit further. I just had a bunch of ideas that I wanted to try out. The rear wheel design made it much easier to move, and it's a little less of a pn to steer on. It's a lot easier to turn with 2 rear wheels and I only have to worry about one side of the wheel turning.

I've only got a day or two this weekend, but hopefully I'll be able to get some pictures of the truck with the actual cab in it. I


Watch the video: mud dog 1000 (August 2022).

Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos