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My dog is always scratching but doesn t have fleas

My dog is always scratching but doesn t have fleas



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My dog is always scratching but doesn t have fleas.

My dog is always scratching but doesn t have fleas. I noticed one time that he was in a wooded area by the creek, when I took him home, I looked at his back and he has big round lumps on him. I tried to clean them out and I see that they are filled with what looks like fleas but I cant tell. Is that normal or are there any other things that could be going on? I also take him to the vet but the doctor was pretty sure he was a he because I dont think he has a girl and that is how dogs are named, he said he is not a he.

Doctor Answers 4

Your dog has dermatophytosis

March 27th, 2013

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It does appear to be dermatophytosis, the most common dermatophytosis seen in dogs. This is a fungus infection that can be diagnosed and treated. Your dog will need to be treated with topical or oral medication for a prolonged period, often months, to rid his skin of the infection.

Your vet is correct in that there is no evidence that your dog is actually a "he" and his body type should make him look like a he to the casual observer.

A dermatophyte is a fungus, but it's not the same as a mite. Mites are parasites, so they don't actually do any "scratching" in that they don't actually harm their host. They just "lurk" on the skin until you rub them off or they come off on their own.

A dermatophyte does damage to the skin and causes skin irritation, causing the scratching.

My recommendation is to keep your dog on the medication until he is rid of the fungus. The infection can be treated successfully, but the length of treatment depends on several factors, and you are correct that it can take a long time.

In addition, you could be correct that the area is not filled with mites. However, if he has been bitten by a flea, there are mites inside the flea that can be transferred to your dog and cause infection, but not always.

If you are uncomfortable with the medications, you can also use one of the over the counter treatments sold as "flea drops" for a similar result. You'll find the manufacturer's instructions to be very helpful.

Your dog has dermatophytosis

March 28th, 2013

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It appears that your dog has a dermatophytic fungus infection, which is also known as ringworm. This is caused by a fungal parasite called a dermatophyte. These fungi normally dwell on the skin, but can be introduced into the skin from wounds, skin infections, and insect bites.

I would first clean your dog's body from head to tail, inside and out. It's not necessary to remove his fur, but you want to make sure you clean his fur-free skin. Use an all-purpose cleaner that is formulated specifically for removing pet stains and dirt. I would also put a bandana or towel on your dog while you're cleaning him.

After cleaning your dog, make sure to dry the area thoroughly with a towel or dryer sheet. This will prevent the fur and skin from becoming re-infected with the fungus. You may need to repeat the cleaning at least three times to ensure you remove all of the fungus.

While cleaning your dog, inspect his fur for mites. They are the white objects on the fur and they look like a grain of sand. If you see any mites, gently remove them by holding them between your fingers and gently pulling them apart.

Once you have removed all of the mites, take a look at the rest of your dog's body. Do you see any other areas of your dog's skin that look like they have any kind of infection? If so, check them as well.

If your dog has only one area of skin with these symptoms, it's a good idea to keep your dog on a broad spectrum medication for about a month. You can do this by mixing one half of a veterinary's prescribed dose of a generic medication, such as Sextant (terbinafine) with his usual food. If you need more information on generic medications, I suggest you contact your veterinarian.

This is a long process. I hope this helps you understand your dog's condition better, and can keep your dog healthy. Best of luck!

Dry Skin, Scratching

March 28th, 2013

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The only way to treat this, is to put the dog on a combination of a topical and oral antifungal. The topical is a combination of a zinc oxide and selenium mixture. It is applied to the entire body, and rubbed in.

This is a good product, it is the only one of its kind that I have used. I used it on a German Shepard for over a year with good success. It is available at most pet stores, as well as veterinarians.

This product is used because of the fact that the fungal infection does not stay in one area. This product kills the fungus, it does not kill the fleas that are on the dog. If there are fleas, this product needs to be used for a month to get the dog completely rid of the problem.

Your dog has dermatophytosis

March 28th, 2013

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This appears to be dermatophytosis (ringworm). This disease is usually secondary to flea bites. The treatment is topical selenium and/or a combination of a zinc oxide-selenium


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